How to change the timing belt TU3JP (KFV) engine.

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My Name: Ozvtr

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Posts: 940
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2003 (53)
Engine Size: 1.4 (8v)
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: 80000
Trim Level: Other
Gearbox: Automatic PRND
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD
Engine name: TU3 (75 PS)
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
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OK, I'm replacing the timing belt and water pump on second C3 to get it back to a known condition. Lucky I did, for reasons that will become apparent later.
The engine is the 1.4 litre 8 valve TU3JP (KFV).
I don't believe that I have ever seen written down by official Citroen sources the recommended interval for changing the timing belt. If anyone has documentary evidence from Citroen stating the replacement interval of the belt, I would be very interested. It should be inspected at regular intervals for signs of damage/ware. "Accepted" service intervals range from 80 to 100 thousand miles (100 to 120 thousand kilometers). However the actual length the belt lasts is dependent on the quality of the belt the quality of the tensioner bearing and if the belt has been installed correctly! A broken belt will result in internal damage to the engine, possibly making the car uneconomical to repair.
I will not put on my tin foil hat and tell you my attitude to timing BELTS but I will mention that most engine manufacturers have gone back to timing chains for greater engine longevity and reduced maintenance costs!
This is a log of what I did and is for informational purposes only.





engine 001.jpg
You will need to fabricate pins to lock the camshaft and crank shaft. Unless you know the complete history of the car I recommend pinning the shafts because otherwise you will not know if the crankshaft is in the correct position. You could "eyeball" the camshaft position but without pinning the crankshaft, it's just a guess as to where the rotational position of the crankshaft is. The old belt on my car was three teeth out of alignment!
The cam shaft is pinned with an 8mm pin. The crank shaft is pinned with a 6mm pin.
I found linch pins of the right diameters at a hardware store and very cheap. The 8mm was a perfect fit, however the 6mm was a tiny bit too large and I had to file it down a bit. I believe it might have been 1/4" and not 6mm.
The 6mm pin for the crank shaft needs to be 30mm long for the part engaging into the housing and bent at about 45 degrees. The overall length is not critical.


engine 002.jpg
Jack the front of the car up and support it with stands.



engine 003.jpg
remove the road wheel and wheel arch liner.



engine 005.jpg
slacken the accessory drive belt tensioner and remove the belt. There are a number of different types of tensioners and I cant cover them all here, sorry.

Remove the two bolts retaining the upper timing belt cover and remove the cover.
Remove the three bolts retaining the harmonic balancer/accessory drive pulley and remove the pulley.


engine 006b.jpg
Jack up the engine by the sump. At this point just take the weight off the engine mount.Yes it is strong enough. Some of the PSA engines have a cast alloy oil pan and you can knock holes in them very easily but not this guy.


engine 007.jpg
engine 008.jpg
Remove the five bolts holding the engine mounts to the chassis and engine bracket.


engine 009.jpg
Carefully let the jack down and remove the lower bolt on the engine bracket.



engine 010.jpg
Jack up the engine and remove the two remaining bolts on the bracket. Remove the bracket.



engine 011.jpg
Remove the three bolts retaining the lower plastic cover.


engine 011a.jpg
engine 011b.jpg
The fly wheel has a groove ground into the face to allow a pin to be inserted through the block and lock the CRANK shaft in a particular position.The CAM shaft sprocket has a hole in it that will line up to a hole in the cylinder head (at roughly the "1 O'clock" position when looking at the sprocket). The purpose is to put the cam shaft and crank shaft in correct alignment for installation of the timing belt. It is possible to change the timing belt without all these shenanigans but 1) you must be sure the belt you are replacing was in the correct alignment in the first place and 2) neither the cam shaft or crank shaft move with respect to each other during the process of removing and installing the belt!
Rotate the crank shaft until the hole in the CAM SHAFT sprocket NEARLY lines up with the hole in the cylinder head (2-3 teeth shy). Remove the oil filter lid and filter. Wrap some rags around the base of the lid before you remove it as it will leak oil. See if the 6mm pin inserts all the way into the cylinder block flange. If it doesn't, then turn the crank shaft a bit more try and insert the pin and so on. Always turn the engine clockwise! Theoretically when the hole in the head and the cam shaft sprocket line up you should be able to pin the crank shaft but it's possible it was not done correctly previously. Also, the belt can stretch a bit and the alignment can be just a little bit out and the 8mm pin wont go into the hole in the head.
At this point it's more important to get the CRANK SHAFT pinned. Do what you need to get it pinned. If you find the CAM SHAFT is out and you cant pin it, dont worry about it at this point.




engine 011c.jpg
If you can, pin the cam shaft. If you cant pin it, pin it after the belt is removed. Earlier I mentioned that I was glad I changed the timing belt. Well it was at this point I discovered that the timing belt was about three teeth out! When I attempted to pin the CRANK SHAFT after lining up the CAM SHAFT, I could not get the pin into the flywheel. So use the hole in the cam shaft sprocket as a guide but do what you have to to get the pin in to the flywheel (crank shaft). Being three teeth out wont make a MASSIVE difference to the performance but it will not be operating to it's optimum. Yes, you can fiddle with the cam timing to get better performance out of an engine but you will need to do a lot of testing of the engine at different settings to get the best out of the engine. That is way beyond our scope here! Yes the eagle eyed viewers will see the timing belt has been removed. I forgot to take a photo.



engine 012.jpg
Remove the nut holding the tensioner and de-tension and remove the belt. Remove the tensioner.



engine 011c.jpg
If you couldn't before, pin the cam shaft now. You can move the cam shaft backwards or forwards (clockwise or counter clockwise) A LITTLE BIT to get the pin to line up. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO COMPLETELY ROTATE THE CAM SHAFT!!!



engine 013.jpg
If you are replacing the water pump, remove the screw and stud retaining the pump. Remove the pump. It may require a knock to dislodge it. I had a lot of trouble removing the water pump but keep at it.



engine 014.jpg
Lubricate the new o-ring with petroleum jelly, silicone lube or rubber grease. Don't use ordinary mineral grease, this will cause the o-ring to glue itself to the aluminium parts. Install the o-ring on the base of the pump. Add a bit more lube over the o-ring.


engine 014a.jpg
Install the new water pump with the the screw and stud combination. Torque to 14Nm.

Stay tuned for part two!
User avatar
My Name: Ozvtr

Moderator
Posts: 940
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2003 (53)
Engine Size: 1.4 (8v)
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: 80000
Trim Level: Other
Gearbox: Automatic PRND
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD
Engine name: TU3 (75 PS)
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 251 times

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Hmm the board wouldn't let me post more pictures in the last post so I had to split it up?



engine 015.jpg
The tensioner. Irrespective whether you are replacing it or not, get familiar with all the parts. Tensioning the timing belt is tricky and the tensioner is the heart of the operation. If it is new and has a pin installed carefully remove the pin, it's spring loaded.



engine 017.jpg
Install the tensioner on the mounting stud with the claws of the mounting plate straddling the webbing as shown. Install the nut but don't tighten it yet.



engine 018.jpg
The timing belt. There may or may not be all of the marks that I'm about to describe on the belt. This is belt is a Gates belt and is arguably of high quality. The part number and specifications should be on any belt. If the direction of rotation is not marked, install the belt any way you like. Timing marks; These are used to confirm that you have the right belt but I'll get to that in a minute.


engine 019.jpg
engine 020.jpg
Install the belt around the crankshaft pulley first (with the timing mark at the 6 o'clock position), then the camshaft sprocket (lining the timing mark at 12 o'clock) then under the tensioner, then around the water pump pulley. Rotate the cam plate on the tensioner by hand so that the belt slips under the tensioner pulley and water pump. The timing marks on the belt are spaced at an uneven distance around the circumference of the belt. Install the "short side" directly between the cam shaft sprocket and the crankshaft pulley. I.E the right hand side as you look at it. If everything is good the the belt should be installed such that the timing marks line up with the 12 o'clock and 6 O'clock teeth on the camshaft and crankshaft pullyes respectively. If they don't line up you have the wrong belt, it is on back-to-front, or something else is wrong. It might take a bit of mucking around to get them to line up but stick with it until you do. The "timing marks" are only a double check and are not critical to the operation. Some experienced mechanics will ignore them to speed the operation up. I am not saying this is a good thing, the belt manufacturer put them on there for a reason!


engine 020a.jpg
engine 021.jpg
engine 021a.jpg
Now comes the tricky part. Turn the cam plate counter clockwise using an allan key to bring the pointer below the hole in the mounting plate. Lock the nut but not too tight. Just enough to hold the assembly. Place a/the pin in the hole in the mounting plate above the indicator. You have now over tensioned the belt to seat it. Remove your tools including the pins in the crank and cam shafts but not the pin in the tensioner mounting plate.



engine 022.jpg
Rotate the crank shaft four revolutions to seat the belt. The timing marks on the belt will no longer line up, so dont worry about that.



engine 023.jpg
Remove the pin from the mounting plate of the tensioner. Insert the allen key into the cam plate again and hold it tightly in position. Slacken off the retaining nut. Rotate the cam plate to bring the pointer UP in line with the notch. DO NOT allow the pointer go past the notch!! Again, hold the allen key tightly in position while you do up the nut. As you tighten the nut the pointer CAN NOT go up past the notch. If it does, undo the nut and start the tensioning from the beginning!
Tighten the nut to 20Nm. The belt has been de-tensioned to the correct tension.

Turn the engine over by hand a couple of revolutions and ensure the belt remains in the middle of the camshaft sprocket. If it wanders to the front or back of the sprocket there is probably something wrong with the tensioner. The belt typically sits to the back of the water pump pulley and not in the center, so don't worry about that.

You can check alignment by pinning the crank shaft and checking the holes in the camshaft sprocket and head. It is possible that the 8mm pin wont go back into the hole in the cylinder head through the sprocket but it should be very close. If you can see the two holes lining up, that's good enough. Even if the belt is one tooth out, you will see that the holes don't line up.

WARNING!! remove all pins and tools. Put the oil filter and cap back on and tighten it to 25Nm!

Re-assembly is just the reverse.

I cant find a spec for the three bolts in the lower plastic cover, the two bolts for the upper plastic cover or the three bolts holding the crankshaft pulley to the crank shaft but my best guess is about 12Nm-15Nm

The torx head bolts holding the engine bracket and engine mount are all 45Nm.
User avatar
My Name: Ozvtr

Moderator
Posts: 940
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2003 (53)
Engine Size: 1.4 (8v)
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: 80000
Trim Level: Other
Gearbox: Automatic PRND
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD
Engine name: TU3 (75 PS)
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 251 times

Post

In answer to my question about replacement intervals for the timing belts Arfur Dent sent me this in a PM.
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