Picasso 2015 Idle Control Valve location

Questions specifically about a Diesel powered C3 (usually engine or fuel related problems)
Please provide as much description including adding photos directly to the topic or videos you have uploaded via youtube as possible.
Forum rules
One question per topic.
No Gearbox questions
Diesel engine related problems
Think: Diesel engine, diesel fuel system, diesel injectors and glow plugs
My Name: buick6001

Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:20 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2015 (65)
Engine Size: 1.6
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 60000
Trim Level: LX
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Has thanked: 3 times

Post

Hi,

Excuse me if this has been aswered before, but my searches have come up a blank..

We have a 2015 C3 Picasso that has started hunting, not going over a certain rev limit etc.

This isnt all the time, but my internet research seems to point to cleaning the idle control valve as good first step to curing this.

I've can see loads of pictures of what a valve looks like, but cannot find it in the engine bay. Is it hidden underneath something?

Can anyone point me to the location of the idle control valve on a 2015 C3 Diesel Picasso?

Thanks in advance
User avatar
My Name: Arfur Dent

Guru
Posts: 3308
Joined: Sat Jul 23, 2011 3:47 pm
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2002 (52)
Engine Size: 1.4 (16v)
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 100000
Trim Level: Exclusive
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Engine name: DV4 16-valve diesel (90 PS)
Has thanked: 259 times
Been thanked: 112 times

Post

buick6001 wrote: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:33 am Hi,

Excuse me if this has been aswered before, but my searches have come up a blank..

We have a 2015 C3 Picasso that has started hunting, not going over a certain rev limit etc.

This isnt all the time, but my internet research seems to point to cleaning the idle control valve as good first step to curing this.

I've can see loads of pictures of what a valve looks like, but cannot find it in the engine bay. Is it hidden underneath something?

Can anyone point me to the location of the idle control valve on a 2015 C3 Diesel Picasso?

Thanks in advance
Please post a VIN because we need to see what engine you have fitted to find this valve not normally found on a Diesel engine.
You can add an avatar to your account - Avatar or change your vehicle details - Car Bio or even add a signature to your posts - Signature. But this is not all you can do in the User Control Panel :)
My Name: buick6001

Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:20 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2015 (65)
Engine Size: 1.6
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 60000
Trim Level: LX
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Has thanked: 3 times

Post

Maybe thats why I cant find it and have been reading posts about petrol engines or older diesel?

VF75HBHY6FT569888.

Thanks for replying
User avatar
My Name: Ozvtr

Moderator
Posts: 941
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2003 (53)
Engine Size: 1.4 (8v)
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: 80000
Trim Level: Other
Gearbox: Automatic PRND
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD
Engine name: TU3 (75 PS)
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 251 times

Post

The idle air control valve is used to "fine tune" the idle speed and compensate for idle speed changes under sudden loads at idle. For example when the aircon compressor kicks in. It is controlled by the engine management unit. To my knowledge it is only used on engines with a manually controlled throttle body. That is, where the throttle is connected to the accelerator peddle by a Bowden cable. If your engine has an electric throttle body (servo type) the throttle butterfly valve is modulated to do this job. If the idle air control valve was to exist on your engine (and it sounds like it doesn't) it would only effect idle and would make no difference to the performance of the engine above idle.
You might need to look at the EGR (Exhaust Gas Re-circulation Valve). This sends exhaust gasses back into the inlet manifold at curtain points of the power cycle. If it opens at the wrong points in the power cycle it will severely degrade engine performance. It too is controlled by the engine management unit but being attached to the exhaust system, it can gum up.
User avatar
My Name: C3CAR

Guru
Posts: 2618
Joined: Wed May 04, 2011 10:01 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2002 (02)
Engine Size: 1.4 (16v)
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 140000
Trim Level: Exclusive
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Engine name: DV4 16-valve diesel (90 PS)
Has thanked: 147 times
Been thanked: 88 times

Post

buick6001 wrote: Sun Jul 28, 2019 3:41 pm Maybe thats why I cant find it and have been reading posts about petrol engines or older diesel?

VF75HBHY6FT569888.

Thanks for replying
Nothing comes back for that VIN :(
My Name: buick6001

Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:20 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2015 (65)
Engine Size: 1.6
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 60000
Trim Level: LX
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Has thanked: 3 times

Post

Eye sight mistake, sorry, that first 5 is an S

VF7S
My Name: buick6001

Member
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2019 10:20 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2015 (65)
Engine Size: 1.6
Fuel Type: Diesel
Mileage: 60000
Trim Level: LX
Gearbox: Manual 5 speed
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD (UK)
Has thanked: 3 times

Post

Ozvtr wrote: Mon Jul 29, 2019 9:08 am The idle air control valve is used to "fine tune" the idle speed and compensate for idle speed changes under sudden loads at idle. For example when the aircon compressor kicks in. It is controlled by the engine management unit. To my knowledge it is only used on engines with a manually controlled throttle body. That is, where the throttle is connected to the accelerator peddle by a Bowden cable. If your engine has an electric throttle body (servo type) the throttle butterfly valve is modulated to do this job. If the idle air control valve was to exist on your engine (and it sounds like it doesn't) it would only effect idle and would make no difference to the performance of the engine above idle.
You might need to look at the EGR (Exhaust Gas Re-circulation Valve). This sends exhaust gasses back into the inlet manifold at curtain points of the power cycle. If it opens at the wrong points in the power cycle it will severely degrade engine performance. It too is controlled by the engine management unit but being attached to the exhaust system, it can gum up.
Thank you for that information, I have the EGR spray, where would be the best place to spray it into........I can see the turbo etc at the front of the engine, I would think that somewhere after that would be best to get at the exhaust...but where would be best.?
User avatar
My Name: Ozvtr

Moderator
Posts: 941
Joined: Wed Jul 10, 2019 3:31 am
Model: C3 2002-2005, Original shape model
Year: 2003 (53)
Engine Size: 1.4 (8v)
Fuel Type: Petrol
Mileage: 80000
Trim Level: Other
Gearbox: Automatic PRND
DPF: No
LHD or RHD: RHD
Engine name: TU3 (75 PS)
Location: Brisbane, Australia.
Has thanked: 36 times
Been thanked: 251 times

Post

I’m not that familiar with diesel engines but I would say removing and inspecting/cleaning it would be the best bet, if that’s the problem (please read the whole post first). The exhaust pick off is part of the cylinder head, so you can’t spray anything into it while the engine is running.
The EGR valve sits at the right rear bottom of the cylinder head and feeds exhaust gas into the inlet manifold on the top left of the cylinder head (as viewed from the front of the car) via a tube along the back of the cylinder head.
Before you do anything else you could disable the EGR valve by removing the electrical connector on the top of it. This will bring up the check engine light but you can ignore that because you know why it’s come on.
From your symptoms (assuming it is the EGR valve) the failure is random and the valve is not stuck open. If it were stuck open engine idle would be VERY rough. If it were stuck close you might not notice any performance change, which I will explain in a minute. Removing the connector should keep it closed. Engine performance should be about the same as usual but because the engine management unit is expecting the EGR system to be working the engine might lack a bit of power and have slightly poorer fuel consumption. However it should be better than it is at the moment. Again, IF it’s the EGR valve! If removing the connector makes absolutely no difference, then I wouldn’t believe it’s the EGR valve.
  • Similar Topics
    Replies
    Views
    Last post